Your Asháninka Impact Report
Spring 2018

Your Asháninka Impact Report <br/> Spring 2018

This spring we’re looking at how training is building capacity in the Asháninka partnership.

Cool Earth’s aim is to create strong, self-sustaining communities, not dependency. From savings groups in Papua New Guinea to the most remote corner shop you’ll ever visit deep in the Amazon rainforest, your support is building strong communities and keeping forest standing for years to come.

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The Amazon rainforest, Peru Where do you buy a flashlight in the rainforest? Or a new cooking pot? Or some chicken wire?

A few of the villages that Cool Earth has partnered with have a weekly market set up by market traders. Not great value but cheaper than paying for an eight-hour boat trip into town. If you live more than a few hours away from the traders’ routes, even these markets are impractical. That’s the case for people in Parijaro. The six-hour walk to the market up increasingly punishing gradients may well be rewarded with a view of the world’s second-biggest waterfall, but it’s certainly not a trip you’d want to take just to pick up a bag of sugar.

Last year the community of Parijaro began plans for a shop. From batteries and lanterns to sanitary products, it will provide essentials that are often hard to come by in remote communities. It’s also a great way of building business skills. Cool Earth Community Facilitator Daylar Capaquia is preparing a training programme for the four community members who’ll be running the shop.They’ll develop skills like managing accounts, planning expenditure, making budgets and cash management.

Asháninka community members, Peru

Lelis, Carmen, Adolfo and Miguel have a name for their new enterprise: Bodega el Paraiso. But one thing is clear. It won’t be open all hours. With opening hours from 6am till 7:30am, and 3pm till 5pm, you have to pick your moment to pick up your essentials. As well as being a great resource for the community, and a source of income for those who run it, the shop also means four community members are developing the skills required to run their own micro businesses in the future.

Businesses that outprice forest destruction and keep carbon where it belongs.

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